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One Hour - Coleman Hawkins - The Indispensable Coleman Hawkins ;Body And Soul; (1927-1956) (Vinyl, LP)

8 thoughts on “ One Hour - Coleman Hawkins - The Indispensable Coleman Hawkins ;Body And Soul; (1927-1956) (Vinyl, LP)

  1. Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for The Indispensable Body & Soul () - Coleman Hawkins on AllMusic - /
  2. Coleman Randolph Hawkins (November 21, – May 19, ), nicknamed "Hawk" and sometimes "Bean", was an American jazz tenor saxophonist. One of the first prominent jazz musicians on his instrument, as Joachim E. Berendt explained: "there were some tenor players before him, but the instrument was not an acknowledged jazz horn".
  3. Coleman Hawkins was the first important tenor saxophonist and he remains one of the greatest of all time. A consistently modern improviser whose knowledge of chords and harmonies was encyclopedic, Hawkins had a year prime () during which he could hold his own with any competitor. Coleman Hawkins started piano lessons when he was five, switched to cello at age seven, and two .
  4. Coleman Hawkins ‎– Soul Label: Original Jazz Classics ‎– OJC, Prestige ‎– , Prestige ‎– P
  5. Coleman Randolph Hawkins, nicknamed Hawk and sometimes "Bean" (November 21, â May 19, ), was an American jazz tenor saxophonist.[2] He was one .
  6. Indispensable (, RCA, compilation: ) Body and Soul (–, RCA, first as LP, ca. , then as CD, ) Disorder at the Border (Spotlite, []) The Hawk Talks (Decca, []) The Hawk Returns (Savoy, ) Timeless Jazz (Jazztones, ) also released as Jazz Tones (Xanadu, []) Accent on Tenor Sax (Urania, ).
  7. Coleman Hawkins was the first important tenor saxophonist and he remains one of the greatest of all time. A consistently modern improviser whose knowledge of chords and harmonies was encyclopedic, Hawkins had a year prime () during which he could hold his own with any competitor. Coleman Hawkins started piano lessons when he was five, switched to cello at age.
  8. This CD is a major surprise. Hawkins had always wanted to record with a large string section and he received his wish on the majority of these 12 romantic melodies, all of which have some association with Paris. The surprise is that he plays with a great deal of fire (his doubletiming on "My Man" is wondrous), and that Manny Albam's arrangements mostly avoid being muzaky and quite often are.

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